Modern South Asia: History, Culture and Political Economy

Modern South Asia History Culture and Political Economy Jointly written by two leading Indian and Pakistani historians Modern South Asia offers a rare depth of historical understanding of the politics cultures and economies that shape the lives of than a

  • Title: Modern South Asia: History, Culture and Political Economy
  • Author: Sugata Bose Ayesha Jalal
  • ISBN: 9780415307871
  • Page: 493
  • Format: Paperback
  • Jointly written by two leading Indian and Pakistani historians, Modern South Asia offers a rare depth of historical understanding of the politics, cultures and economies that shape the lives of than a fifth of humanity After sketching the pre modern history of the sub continent, the book concentrates on the last three centuries.This new second edition has been updateJointly written by two leading Indian and Pakistani historians, Modern South Asia offers a rare depth of historical understanding of the politics, cultures and economies that shape the lives of than a fifth of humanity After sketching the pre modern history of the sub continent, the book concentrates on the last three centuries.This new second edition has been updated throughout to take account of recent historical research It includes an expanded section on post independence with a completely new chapter on the period from 1991 to the present and a chapter on the last millennium in subcontinental history There is a new chronology of key events.

    • Modern South Asia: History, Culture and Political Economy By Sugata Bose Ayesha Jalal
      493 Sugata Bose Ayesha Jalal
    • thumbnail Title: Modern South Asia: History, Culture and Political Economy By Sugata Bose Ayesha Jalal
      Posted by:Sugata Bose Ayesha Jalal
      Published :2019-07-17T20:53:13+00:00

    About "Sugata Bose Ayesha Jalal"

    1. Sugata Bose Ayesha Jalal

      Sugata Bose is the Gardiner Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs at Harvard University.He was born in Calcutta, India He studied at the Presidency College, Kolkata He earned his Ph.D at the University of Cambridge under Eric Stokes He is the grandnephew of Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose and grandson of Nationalist leader Sarat Chandra Bose.He is the author of several books on the economic, social and political history of modern South Asia, and has pioneered work in historical studies emphasizing the centrality of the Indian Ocean He is heading the mentors group for revival of Presidency College.He is married to Ayesha Jalal, a prominent Pakistani historian.

    506 thoughts on “Modern South Asia: History, Culture and Political Economy”

    1. This is an okay book but "Modern South Asia" turned out to be just India and Pakistan with some mention of Bangladesh. It's wild because the introduction takes time out to briefly talk about the construction of South Asia and actual plurality of countries which occupy that region but then dismisses groundwork by saying (no joke), we're just going to talk about India and Pakistan. It makes me wonder if we keep (and we must) with the very obvious reality of these distinct countries, could there ev [...]


    2. A concise book for anyone who wants to let in themselves into the history of Modern South Asia. Good language, not a book stuffed with the usual academic jargon.


    3. Very well-done, insightful examination of South Asian history, with a focus on the 1800s and 1900s. I particularly liked how the authors examined parallels and similarities between India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh after Partition, instead of treating them as entirely separate. It also had a very good take on how communal identities have become so important in politics. Unfortunately it only goes up to 1997. It's not a great introduction for someone unfamiliar with the topic, but it is a wonderful [...]


    4. A recommended read for the beginners in the South-Asian history with an interest in Pak-India socio-cultural and political dynamics, as the title might suggest. Although the pre-Mughal era is only briefly covered however the context given jusfy the arguments without much reliance on elaborate explanations.


    5. An excellent intro to South Asian historiography. The aspect of it that I found particularly useful was that Jalal and Bose were not coy about naming the names of historians whose work they found subpar and detailing the reasons why.


    6. A very concise (less than 200 pages of narrative) history of South Asia from around 1600 CE onward. A very accessible and complete explanation of British colonialism in South Asia with a well-rounded perspective of the subsequent nationalist movements.


    7. How much do you really know about Asian history? If you are like a lot people, that answer might be little to none. A great resource for you to have is Sugata Bose and Ayesha Jalal's Modern South Asia: History, Culture, Political Economy.Within this academic book, you will discover much about the history of the different areas of Southern Asia. This book does not just take one area or one aspect. It tries to give an all encompassing view of the history where anyone could come from any background [...]


    8. The book goes on till 2002, lot of things has happened since then, from the discovery of whereabouts of Osama Bin Laden in Pakistan to the recent Love Jehad campaign in India. It may serves as a good revision and learning, filled with the debates in South Asian (by which they mean Indian-Pakistani-Bangladeshi, in that order) history and the broader, thematic contours, than the specifics but being academic in nature, it's not a great introduction for someone unfamiliar with the topic, but it is a [...]


    9. This short volume provides a synthesis of modern South Asian political (and to a lesser extent social) history and a light survey of the historiography/debates. As such, it's better suited for those who either already are familiar with the subject or are reading it while taking a class -- the book is a gloss, albeit a formidable one. For others, it serves as a decent refresher, but more of the debates in South Asian (by which they mean Indian-Pakistani-Bangladeshi, in that order) history and the [...]


    10. Perhaps due to its ambitious scope and focus on the modern narrative, the early sections at times read like a textbook, and despite what its title may suggest, most of the discussion of modern history put politics before culture or economics. The book's success lies in its balancing a critical approach to South Asia's colonial masters with an equally honest appraisal of the failings and shortcomings of pro-independence and post-independence leaders. Even Ghandi does't escape the authors' critica [...]


    11. This is an impressive overview of South Asian history, going over key debates and events in the last three centuries with some clarity. Be it cultural, economic, social or political many angles are covered here and an extensive bibliography is supplied for further invesitgation, but for a starting reader on the history of the times you will probably find no better book.


    12. Histories of South Asia are written by people who either 1) think that all of South Asia's problems today were caused by the British playing Hindus off the Muslims or 2) think that that the BRITISH WERE TOTAL BASTARDS!!!. This book was written by the former.


    13. The books focus is almost entirely on politics, very little on culture or economics. It is okay, a bit dry, though I suppose that is to be expected when the authors are trying to cover so much ground. Not worth crying over if you miss reading this one.



    14. An analytical, distinctive and interpretive work at modern south Asia, it goes beyond the categories of nation states and breaches the boundary of 1947 in examining and synthesizing the history and polity of south Asia, incorporating latest research and thoughts in historiography.


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